Silent Nights: Martin Edwards ed.

“Not a nice murder. Not at all a nice murder.”

Silent Nights, another entry in the British Library Crime Classics series, is a compilation of short stories–all with the common factor that the action takes place over Christmas. Police agencies and even the FBI warn that crime increases during the holiday season. Is it all the late night shopping, the carrying of cash? In other words, is the increase due to increased opportunities or are the statistics driven more by the need of the criminal to provide extra for their families? After reading Silent Nights, if there’s a connective theme, it’s how the Christmas season creates opportunities for criminals, and in some instances the season even creates such tempting opportunities that normally honest people turn to crime.

Here’s a breakdown of the stories:

  • The Blue Carbuncle: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Parlour Tricks: Ralph Plummer
  • A Happy Solution: Raymund Allen
  • The Flying Stars: G. K. Chesterton
  • Stuffing: Edgar Wallace
  • The Unknown Murderer: H.C. Bailey
  • The Absconding Treasurer: J. Jefferson Farjeon
  • The Necklace of Pearls: Dorothy L. Sayers
  • The Case is Altered: Margery Allingham
  • Waxworks: Ethel Lina White
  • Cambric Tea: Marjorie Bowen
  • The Chinese Apple: Joseph Shearing
  • A Problem in White: Nicholas Blake
  • The Name on the Window: Edmund Crispin
  • Beef for Christmas: Leo Bruce

Short story collections are a great way to discover new names, and in  Silent Nights, there are some very famous names and others I’d never heard of. This collection begins with an intro by Martin Edwards and each story is prefaced with short biographical content.

silent nightsSome of the stories are very traditional ‘who-dun-its,’ so in Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Blue Carbuncle, the mystery concerns a lost top hat and a stolen diamond with Holmes managing to deduce a great deal from the hat that has seen better days while Watson stands on the sidelines wondering just how Holmes manages to make such brilliantly accurate conclusions.  Other stories, such as Dorothy Sayers’ The Necklace of Pearls and Edgar Wallace’s Stuffing take place at Christmas country gatherings. Some stories are very deadly serious detective stories which concern murder while other stories are light and humorous in tone.

“A radical does not mean a man who lives on radishes,” remarked Crook, with some impatience; “and a Conservative does not mean a man who preserves jam. Neither, I assure you, does a Socialist mean a man who desires a social evening with the chimney-sweep. A Socialist means a man who wants all the chimneys swept and all the chimney-sweeps paid for it.”

“But who won’t allow you,” put in the priest in a low voice,” to own your own soot.”

That’s an excerpt from the witty G.K Chesterton story, The Flying Stars.

Of the collection, and there’s a very nice range of stories here, I have to say that I was much more attracted to the unusual stories: The Unknown Murderer: H. C Bailey, Waxworks: Ethel Lina White, Cambric Tea: Marjorie Bowen, and The Chinese Apple: Joseph Shearing.

The Unknown Murderer from H. C Bailey is the story of a serial killer, and the story’s powerful sense of evil set this tale rather disturbingly apart from the others. Waxworks from Ethel Lina White concerns an intrepid young female reporter who opts to spend the night in a waxworks museum to investigate the truth behind the mysterious deaths that have taken place there. In Cambric Tea, a young doctor sacrifices  his Christmas holiday in order to attend to a cantankerous old man who insists he’s being poisoned by his wife. In The Chinese Apple, a woman reluctantly travels to England from Florence in order to take over the care of a niece she’s never met.

Ethel Lina White also wrote the novel Some Must Watch which was made into the film The Spiral Staircase. Joseph Shearing is one of the male pen names used by Marjorie Bowen, so in other words, she ( author’s real name, Gabrielle Margaret Vere Long)  made my short list twice. The biographical intro to the story from Martin Edwards mentions that ‘Joseph Shearing’ wrote For Her to See (made into the film So Evil My Love) which was inspired by the real Charles Bravo murder case. Film fans may be interested to know that Marjorie Bowen, as Joseph Shearing  also wrote Blanche Fury and Moss Rose. Three out of four of my favourite stories, Waxworks, Cambric Tea and The Chinese Apple were very cinematic stories, and perhaps that’s no coincidence.

Review copy

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9 Comments

Filed under Allingham Margery, Chesterton G.K., Farjeon J. Jefferson, Fiction

9 responses to “Silent Nights: Martin Edwards ed.

  1. I’m quite tempted by this collection, Guy. Sounds like it contains a good mix of stories, and (as you say) these anthologies are a great way of trying ‘new’ authors. I often turn to short stories over Xmas, especially if I’m a bit pressed for time to read. Thanks for reviewing this!

  2. Sounds like a nice read by a roaring fire with a few chestnuts roasting. Chesterton is very funny although he was such a hide-bound old reactionary.
    “Nice” murders reminds me of a pink-faced ladylike young nun at my school who used to wring her hands over some behaviour of ours and declare, “Girls, it’s just not nice!”

  3. I will add this for next year so that I have at least one seasonal read! I do like the sound of the wide range of stories – great review!

  4. I saw this in a bookshop and didn’t know whether or not I should get it. I wish I had. It sounds so diverse.

  5. I love the G.K Chesterton quote.
    Short stories are nice when you’re busy and the Holiday season is one of those busy times.
    It’s nice that they put a little bio of the writers in your edition. I wish that the French publishers did as well as English-speaking ones on adding forewords, afterwords, comments and other informative texts.

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