Her Every Fear: Peter Swanson

I somehow missed Peter Swanson’s blockbuster The Kind Worth Killing; I’ve heard so many positive things about the book that I knew I couldn’t miss Her Every Fear.  After finishing Her Every Fear, I took a look at reviews and the consensus seems to be that The Kind Worth Killing is a better read. That’s reassuring; I liked Her Every Fear but found the book to have problems–more of that later.

So here’s the plot: London-based Kate Priddy agrees to a six-month long apartment swap with her second cousin, Bostonian Corbin Dell. The two have never met, but arrangements are made via e-mail. For Kate, who has always been on the neurotic side and is still recovering from a horrible experience involving an ex-boyfriend, the opportunity to live in Boston for six months allows her to try and put the past behind her.

her-every-fear

Problems for Kate begin almost immediately; she hasn’t even entered the front door of her cousin’s large, lush apartment (“like something out of a Henry James novel,“) when she meets a young woman who is knocking frantically on the front door of the next apartment, looking for a neighbour who is apparently missing. The neighbour is, or should I say, was Audrey Marshall, and she’s been murdered and mutilated inside the apartment right next to Kate.

Enter two new men in Kate’s life: Alan Cherney, a man whose voyeuristic tendencies led to an obsession with Audrey, and Jack who claims to be Audrey’s ex-boyfriend. Soon Kate is communicating with Corbin via e-mail, and he claims he barely knew Audrey. Yet according to Alan, who constantly observed Audrey from afar, Corbin and Audrey had a sexual relationship…..

The first part of the book, with the action focusing on Kate’s perspective, was compulsively readable, and the plot moves along at a terrific, nail-biting pace, but then the plot slows when it switches to Corbin and his past.

The plot requires the reader to wrestle a bit with plausibility. Kate is already badly damaged by her past when she lands in the middle of a murder in Boston. How likely is it that she would open herself up to a strange man knowing that there’s a killer on the loose? I struggled with this, but then decided to accept Kate’s actions as she has a history of being a psycho magnet. The plot makes it clear that Kate isn’t the most stable woman on the planet–she forgets where she’s put her medication, and she forgets, or thinks she forgets or misplaces, several other things at crucial moments. And here’s a plot element I struggled with: I don’t know about you, but if I had a door going from my apartment to the basement, I’d go buy a hammer and nail that sucker shut, but Kate, who has a history of panic attacks,  manages to live with it…..

I had a more difficult time, for reasons I cannot extrapolate, with the character of Corbin. Those of you who’ve read the book may know what I mean….

Anyway, Her Every Fear is a good beach, plane or train read. You could even be stuck in the middle of a doctor’s office with half a dozen annoying conversations flying over your head, and the plot will keep your attention. This Female in Peril novel, with its emphasis on slimy, creepy voyeurism, is flawed but entertaining.

Review copy

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8 Comments

Filed under Fiction, Swanson Peter

8 responses to “Her Every Fear: Peter Swanson

  1. I think that believability is so important in a book like this. The lack of it might seriously mar the reading experience for me.

    With that, other aspects of the book sound good.

  2. There’s always a problem when a character (and it’s usually a woman, for some reason) is emoting like crazy and at the same time failing to do something so obvious to protect herself. Either the writer has to go into some convoluted psychological explanation or just cross his fingers and hope you’ll go with it.

  3. Sounds quite good but makes me actually want to read his first novel. Btw I know you subscribed to my blog via email, did you get my latest posts? I changed my domain name? I think it works via feed readers, so I thought I ask.

  4. Soon you’ll have a Beach & Public Transport category too! 🙂

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