Category Archives: McKenzie Catherine

The Good Liar: Catherine McKenzie

In some ways, The Good Liar mirrors the all-too familiar headlines of our current times, but the back story explores the aftermath of grief through the lens of three women who all played a role in a horrific tragic event.

Triple Ten is the name given to the event: this was an explosion that ripped apart a Chicago building and left hundreds dead or missing. It’s now a year later, the anniversary of the event, and Cecily Grayson, who has, unwillingly, become the poster woman for the tragedy, is still unable to move on with her life. Then there’s Kate, a woman who’s working as a nanny for an affluent family in Canada. Finally, there’s  Franny, a young woman whose birth mother died in the fire.

The Good Liar

Through these three characters (with published articles and the transcripts of interviews from a documentary filmmaker thrown in) it gradually becomes clear that all three women are lying to one extent or another. Slowly, the real stories of the relationships lost in the fire emerge.

A shiver runs through me, because that is how I feel now all the time, that nervous feeling like something bad’s about to happen, something I could avoid if I knew which event to skip, which route not to take, which call not to answer. 

Cecily Grayson, now in therapy, a widow and mother of two, is the main character here, which is a good thing as she is sympathetic.  At first, all we know about Kate is that she fled Chicago and hasn’t returned. Franny, who had just managed to reconnect with her birth mother, has become a permanent fixture in the family her deceased birth mother left behind. While Cecily and Franny run a foundation which dispenses compensation to the victims of the tragedy, there’s a slippery unease between them which is hard to place.

Through the plot, the story explores how we grieve, and how guilt combined with lack of closure disrupt the healing process. But there’s also the thriller element here, a streak of danger, a stench of psycho running through the narrative, and while the plot takes a long time to get there, we know that explosive confrontations will occur.

Cecily is the most convincing character here, and it’s easy to identify with her conflicting feelings of anger and loss combined with the shattered sense of security and safety. As always with domestic thrillers, we are left pondering the choices our characters make. Some of these choices are foolish, some are downright illogical, but then we all know people who constantly make stupid mistakes. I guessed the big reveal, which was a shame. Glancing over reviews on Goodreads, the book seems to be a big hit with fans. While I liked the lack of closure/guilt elements, the thriller/psycho aspect of the book stretched credulity for this reader.

Review copy

 

 

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Fractured: Catherine McKenzie

“Rearranging the deck chairs of the Titanic, I’d taken to calling what I was doing on a daily basis.”

Imagine that you are a wildly successful author whose first novel, The Murder Game, sold over a million copies (and counting). The royalties are pouring in, plus there’s a film version in the works. You’re young, attractive, and you have a wonderful, patient, supportive and dependable husband who shoulders a great deal of the care for your six-year-old twins. Who wouldn’t trade places with Linda Apple, lawyer turned best-selling author? Well hold, on. Before you get too envious of Linda’s life, there’s a lot of trouble simmering under the surface.

Linda Apple, her husband and twins move from Tacoma for a fresh start in Ohio. They move into an affluent neighbourhood hoping to put Linda’s problems with a stalker far behind them. This isn’t some random stalker, this is Heather Stanhope, a former law classmate of Linda’s who’s stoked the rumour that The Murder Game is based on the mysterious death of Linda’s friend and roommate, Kathryn. Given Heather’s computer skills and her ability to hide behind various internet identities, it was a miracle that Linda was finally able to prove that Heather was the stalker who caused so many of the bad things that happened. But still there’s just a shadow of a lingering doubt that perhaps Linda created some of the press herself….

fractured

The fresh start in the Eden Park neighbourhood turns sour quickly. There’s a neighbourhood association run by the perfect wife and mother, Cindy. It all started out with seemingly good intentions: neighbourhood watch and block parties, but with Cindy in charge and making all the rules, soon Linda finds herself unwelcome in the neighbourhood. And then bad things begin to happen again.

The novel is told in two voices: Linda and her neighbour, and running partner, John Dunbar, who lives across the street. The novel begins in the present, then shifts back to a year ago when Linda first moved into the neighbourhood. Through the chapters, the story then moves forward to the present.

Fractured is a page-turner. No arguing that one. We know that something bad happened in the neighbourhood, and exactly what that is, is gradually revealed through the unfolding story. Author Catherine McKenzie gives us someone to loathe: Cindy, the seemingly perfect wife and mother who single handedly runs the neighbourhood association. Some people see her as a little over-zealous, but she’s a truly horrible person, encouraging everyone to use an app to monitor the comings-and-goings of their neighbours, all in the name of safety.

But what of Linda? I found her a somewhat unreliable narrator (not sure if I was supposed to), but this gray area made the book more interesting for this reader. There are several times in the book where Linda’s actions are called into question by her neighbours: hint: when you take your dog for a walk, remember the poop bag. Linda has a German Shepherd trained to attack. (At one point she says that next year, it’s going to be her 6 year old twins job to walk the dog. Is she NUTS???) Controlled, directed aggression is one of the most difficult behaviours to inculcate in a dog (note the number of times police dogs go off the rails once their ‘killmode’ is switched on). Linda uses her dog in a morally reprehensible fashion, and then fails to acknowledge her own responsibility. But this is not a lone incident that highlights Linda’s moral flaws. There are several times throughout the novel when she does stuff and pretends (or acts like) it was all an accident. Unfortunately, these incidents were too frequent and establish a pattern of behaviour of failing to take responsibility, so instead of Linda being a heroine, she was a shady figure, and that worked well too.

The ending didn’t quite work for me, and I kept wondering why Linda, who was loaded, didn’t move to a gated community for security or leave Eden Park when things went South. With these sort of domestic-threat novels, readers know that characters will make mistakes. After all, that’s often how they get into trouble in the first place. The imperative, however, is that the mistakes still be plausible even if the decisions are stupid or ill-advised. There were a couple of places where Linda, who’d been terrorised by her stalker, doesn’t act sensibly at all, but the author plays with the theory that Linda may have helped create her own publicity and then there are those meds Linda is taking. Still, I found some of the aspects of the story stretched credibility. in Linda’s shoes, you’d have to be a complete moron not to have a secured network. But in spite of its flaws, this highly readable, well-paced novel explores the issue of maintaining privacy in today’s world, and exactly how an author who needs a public presence on social media can battle against stalkers.

I will be reading The Murder Game to get to the bottom of what really happened to Kathryn. Yes Linda, you can run but you can’t hide…..

review copy

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