Category Archives: Stevenson Jane

It’s a Wrap: 2020

It’s been a great reading year and here’s the list:

The Spectator Bird: Wallace Stegner

Narrated by former literary agent, Joe Allston, this marvellous novel focuses on aging and the choices we make. As Joe reflects back on his life, he is full of regrets, yet the choices we make are part of who we are.

To quote Etta James: “If I did it any other way,
It wouldn’t be me.” (Life, Love and the Blues.)

Abigail: Magda Szabó

This impressive Hungarian author sets her novel in WWII. The main character is Gina, a 14 -year-old daughter of a general. Gina’s life changes drastically when her father leaves her at a distant, strict, cloistered all-girls school. Gina, at first furious with her father, eventually learns the power of self-discipline–an invaluable trait, especially in the face of unexpected betrayals. An incredible book.

Valentine: Elizabeth Wetmore: This is the story of a what happens to a handful of women in a small east Texas town following a brutal rape. This is a debut novel, so here is an author to watch.

White Ivy: Susie Yang. Another debut novel that is so assured, so powerful, that I can’t wait for the next novel. The main character here is Ivy, the very troubled daughter of Chinese immigrants. She hungers for the American Dream (money, status) and in the process, any sense of self and identity evaporate and all that is left is a transgressive female, a shape-shifter who is willing to become whatever she needs to be.

Providence: Max Barry. I waited years for another Max Barry. And it was well worth it. In this novel, set mostly aboard a vast space ship, Max Barry goes full sci-fi (fans knew it was coming). We follow a small crew of people as they pursue an alien race, the Salamanders, throughout deep space. Who is in charge? The Captain or the ship’s AI system. Which is more reliable? Man vs. Alien, Man vs AI, all wrapped up in a tale in which social media plays a creepy role. I couldn’t put this book down.

The Imposter: Damon Galgut. Set in South Africa, this is a tale of moral choices and moral dilemmas. After losing his job, Adam decides to retreat to a remote area and write poetry. Guess what…. it doesn’t work out.

More Better Deals: Joe Lansdale. This is a stand-alone noir novel. A used car salesman, a sex-hungry wife and a murder plot. What more do you want?

Good Women: Jane Stevenson. A trilogy of novellas and each one is a wicked, transgressive delight.

Tides: Edouard von Keyserling. What is it about the decaying Prussian Empire? A bunch of Prussian aristocrats gather at a seaside resort for a holiday. Problems arise with the appearance of a former countess who ran away from her elderly husband.

On the Holloway Road: Andrew Blackman. This is what happens when a writer who is in a slump misidentifies a looney’s energy as meaningful and authentic. Part road-trip, part examination of the authenticity of rebellion, this book contains one of my favourite themes: How to Blow Up Your Life.

Theft: Luke Brown. Quirky, understated, darkly funny and also transgressive. How ‘accidents,’ mishaps, and loose lips get us what we really want.

 

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Filed under Barry, Max, Blackman Andrew, Brown Luke, Fiction, Galgut Damon, Keyserling Edouard von, Stegner Wallace, Stevenson Jane, Szabo Magda, Wetmore Elizabeth, Yang Susie

Good Women: Jane Stevenson (Part 3)

I have spent an entire lifetime unobtrusively making things easier for people and, over the years, I have developed a certain talent for it.”

What exactly is a ‘good woman?’ That’s the question I came away with after finishing Jane Stevenson’s Good Women. In this collection of 3 novellas, we see three very different women: In Light My Fire, Freda is great in bed but really… what was married architect David Laurence thinking when he tossed aside a perfectly decent wife and two children for Freda–a woman, who, let’s face it, screams trouble?

In Walking With Angels, middle-aged Wenda, saddled with a boring life and an even more boring husband turns to her constant companions: the angels. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing when all she does is chat to them, but when she decides to start a business healing people, her husband attempts to intervene.

On the surface Wenda could be described as a ‘good woman,’ but that tag doesn’t fit by the time her story is finished.

So onto Garden Guerillas. .. Following the death of her husband Geoff, Alice still remains in their large 3 storey Georgian home in Kew Greens. Alice fell in love with the house forty years earlier. The house was in disrepair, and while Geoff didn’t want to buy it, Alice could not be dissuaded. They scrimped and scraped and it was some years before they could finally tackle repairs. Alice loves the house, but it’s the garden that’s her greatest treasure.

After Geoff’s death, Alice’s son, his wife and children, who also live in London, begin visiting a bit more. How sweet, right? No. The daughter-in law has her eyes on Alice’s house, and Alice catches her divvying up the bedrooms. After all, according to the d in law, the house is just ‘too much’ for Alice these days.

What ensues is an ugly episode all based on money. I sided with Alice and she behaved far better than I would have. Alice has to swallow some ugly facts: her son is weak, she’s seen as ‘in the way,’ and she will lose her magnificent garden.

While Alice’s son and d in law plot to get the house and shove Alice off to a flat, that’s not the last of the insults. Possibly the very worst thing you can say to a gardener is that the beautiful garden they slaved over takes care of itself. Well Alice has her revenge.

Of the three novellas, Garden Guerillas was my favourite. It’s a story of moving on but also not letting yourself be steamrolled by those who ‘love you’ so much…

And the descriptions of the garden. Surely Jane Stevenson must be a gardener?

It was the endless dance through time which drew me out into the garden every day; the constant recomposition of the picture as one element receded and another came forward. It was beautiful every single week, even in winter, but it was never beautiful in exactly the same way, I couldn’t paint worth a damn, as I discovered in my far-distant youth, but in that garden I had become an artist. Kew had taken me and taught me.

So what’s a good woman? There’s a commonality in all of these stories; despite the diverse settings and circumstances, these women triumph and survive. The ever-changing garden is a metaphor for life: one door closes and another opens in a “constant recomposition” way.

I had had plenty of practice in being taken for granted, but I drew the line at being eradicated.

Thanks again to The Gerts.

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Good Women: Jane Stevenson (part 2)

Jane Stevenson’s Good Women contains 3 novellas, and each of these tales centres on three very different female protagonists. After finishing the book, which is quite marvelous BTW (thank you Gerts), I thought about what it meant to be a good woman–what the author intended.

The first novella Light My Fire is the story of a married architect who abandons wife and children after beginning an affair with a “sex bomb.”  Freda is a lot of things: a rapacious sex partner, a high-maintenance woman, not too bright etc etc. (although her native cunning and primo self-preservation kick in when necessary). She is NOT by any stretch of the imagination a ‘good woman’ unless you are just counting sex, and, in this case, her sex appeal is a death trap. 

So onto the second story, Walking With Angels. Middle-aged Wenda, who works part-time at a chemist, is married to lumpish Derek. It’s a dull marriage and a dull, predictable life, with evenings spent watching the telly as they eat their meals on trays. Wenda starts seeing angels, and she says they communicate with her. She keeps this to herself, but then when the opportunity arises, she heals a coworker. 

Wenda is a peculiar woman, easy to underestimate; she’s no doubt quite bonkers, and while she has the trappings of being a ‘good woman’–immaculate housewife, cook, good housekeeper etc., there are transgressive elements under the surface. When she finds violent porn on her husband’s computer, she uses her discovery as leverage, and then there are some sexual details of Wenda and Derek’s courtship. …

Back in the olden days, it’s women were the spiritual ones. Then the men put a stop to it because their noses were out of joint. They reckoned women had too much power, you see and then cause they couldn’t connect with the Chi energy themselves, they made up all this stuff about hellfire to keep us in our place. It’s all there in history. I’ve read about it. 

The coworker pushes Wenda to use her ‘gift.’ Again, like Freda, Wenda isn’t too bright. She doesn’t grasp that her ‘gift’ has become a money-making opportunity, not for Wenda, but for the mini-industry that springs up around her, pushing her to become a ‘professional.’ And while Freda has her strong sense of self-preservation to protect her, Wenda has her angels to tell her how to proceed. As Wenda pursues her true calling as a healer, developing cards, a jewelry line, and even aromatherapy oils, Derek, who’s in charge of the finances, decides to put his foot down. Good luck with that.

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