Tag Archives: time travel

Vintage 1954: Antoine Laurain

On the cover of my copy of Antoine Laurain’s Vintage 1954, there’s the sentence: If you could travel to the Paris of your dreams… I started to wonder which era in Paris I would pick. I’d definitely pass on The French Revolution thank you very much. Same with the Commune. I’d probably drift towards the 60s but then again, I wouldn’t mind having a gander at Napoleon. Ultimately though, I’d prefer to hang out with Balzac.

Vintage 1954

But back to the topic at hand. … It’s interesting that apparently the Paris of “your dreams” is 1954. That lands us right in there with Edith Piaf, Salvador Dali, Jean Gabin and French New Wave Cinema. The book is initially set in Paris 2017. Bob Brown, a somewhat naive yet goodhearted American from Milwaukee travels solo to Paris to fulfill the dream he and his now-comatose wife shared of travelling to see the sights. It’s a sad trip, but he’s trying his best to be optimistic, making the journey for himself and for his wife, Goldie, who can’t be there. He’s rented an airbnb in the Rue Edgar-Charellier and arrives just in time to find Hubert Larnaudie locked in the cellar by thieves. Bob enlists the help of residents restoration specialist Magalie “Abby” and mixologist Julien to rescue Hubert. After Hubert is liberated, he pulls out a bottle of 1954 wine to celebrate. They all drink and when they wake, they have been transported back to 1954.

I’ll backpedal a bit and add that Julien’s great-grandfather, swore he saw a UFO in 1954. Known thereafter as “Mr Flying Saucer,” he vanished in 1978, along with his dog, after watching Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

The book takes off when our main characters wake and find themselves in 1954. This section of the book is really well done (reminds me of the film Visitors). Our characters can’t stop reaching for their cell phones–even though they no longer work. Euros are “funny money,” and poor Bob, as a tourist, doesn’t even realise that he’s slipped back in time. As far as he’s concerned the French “had resisted the march of modernity, happily holding onto their traditions.”

One of the questions underlying the plot is “what would you do if you were able to travel back in time?” First these misplaced characters must survive, but then the three french characters, Hubert, Julien and Magalie find themselves digging back into the past in one form or another. Hubert has a hilarious mis-adventure involving a missing relative who took off for Chile and subsequently disappeared without a trace. Magalie’s use of time is more poignant. Julien revisits his current employer: Harry’s Bar and mulls over The Corridors of Time.

Vintage 1954 is a lighthearted, playful novel, a time travel romp lashed with life lessons and a miracle or two. I prefer Laurain’s darker work where people go stark raving bonkers.

But that’s just me. Nonetheless I enjoyed reading this and I slotted this in, deliberately, as an antidote, between two extremely dark reads.

Translated by Jane Aitken/Emily Boyce

Review copy

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Filed under Fiction, Laurain Antoine

Expiration Date: Duane Swierczynski

Regular readers of this blog know that I’m a fan of Duane Swierczynski, and with the arrival of 2016, it seemed like a good time to attack those bookshelves and get to his backlist, and that brings me to Expiration Date, a novel which clearly shows this author’s comic book roots.

expiration date

Set in the author’s native Philadelphia, this is a tale of unemployed journalist, Mickey Wade who finds himself, at 37 years old, with just over a $100 to his name, moving into his hospitalized grandfather’s run down apartment in Frankford, “one of the busiest drug corridors in the city.” Mickey thinks he’s hit rock bottom.

Slumming is one thing when you’re twenty two and just out of college and backed up by a deep-pile parental checking account. But moving into a bad neighborhood when you’re thirty-seven and have exhausted all other options is something else entirely. It’s a heavy thing with a rope, dragging you down to a lower social depth with no easy way back to the surface.

Waking from a hangover, Mickey opens his grandfather’s padlocked medicine cabinet and finds a “oversized vintage jar of Tylenol with a worn and cracked label,” stamped with an expiration date of 1982. Mickey takes four, goes to sleep, and wakes up in 1972….

Going back to the past is an intriguing idea. At first Mickey just takes disturbing trips for nostalgia and curiosity, but then realizes that something much deeper is afoot when he digs through papers and medical reports in his grandfather’s apartment which link these pills, and the things he sees on his various journeys, to the brutal, senseless slaying of his father that occurred decades earlier. The big question becomes, ‘can Mickey change the past?’

The more I practiced, the better my aim. The human mind is capable of all kinds of amazing tricks. Like telling yourself the night before that you want to wake up at a  certain time in the morning. more often than not, you wake up at that time–even beating the alarm clock you set as a backup.

So whenever I popped a pill, or the sliver of a pill, I started thinking hard about the date I wanted.

February 24.

February 28.

March 10.

March 30.

And so on.

No matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t go back beyond the day I was born–February 22, 1972. This seemed the default line, and it was disappointing. The journalist in me had fantasies about going back to November 22, 1963, staking out the grassy knoll in Dallas and putting that nearly fifty-year-old story to bed. Dear Oliver Stone, my e-mail would begin….

But nothing doing. If I concentrated on February 21, 1972–or any day preceding it–I ended up back in February 22, 1972, by default.

I also couldn’t go back to a time I’d already visited. Maybe this was a built-in protection feature to prevent me from ripping open the fabric of reality , or something.

It worked.

The story includes a mental asylum, sinister secret government experiments, astral projection, but the pills, as Mickey discovers, have different results depending on who’s taking them….

Mickey Wade’s gnarly old grandfather may be lying in his hospital bed hooked up to numerous tubes and monitoring machines, but that doesn’t stop him from being a major player in this tale. Mickey’s mother, defeated by life’s disappointments, and now living with an ambulance chasing lawyer, Whiplash Walt, also makes an appearance.

Whiplash Walt was in rare form. Touching my mom’s shoulders, her back, her waist–like he was planning on killing her later and wanted to place as many fingerprints as possible, just so the Philly PD would be extra-clear who’d done it.

I’ve read a number of Swierczynski novels–all crime, all the time, so this book, with the time travel ‘butterfly effect‘ twist, was quite different from the others I read, but then again, when I think about what happened to Charlie Hardie, perhaps I shouldn’t be too surprised. As always with this author and his seemingly casual, lightly humorous style, this was a fun read. The novel certainly serves to showcase this author’s range, and the illustrations by Laurence Campbell underscore the author’s comic book roots.

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Filed under Fiction, Swierczynski Duane