Letters to Alice: On First Reading Jane Austen by Fay Weldon

“A writer’s all, Alice, is not taken up by the real world. There is something left over: enough for them to build these alternative, finite realities.”

Fay Weldon’s book Letters to Alice: On First Reading Jane Austen takes the epistolary form from the author to her niece, Alice. I knew with the glorious combo of Jane Austen and Fay Weldon, two authors (and women) I admire, I couldn’t go wrong. And I was correct; this is delightful, humorous read, and yes while it’s about Jane Austen, the book is about a lot more than that. Weldon gives us her take on what it means to be a writer, what is means to be a reader, as well as sundry tips to Alice, poor girl, who seems, seen through this one-sided correspondence, to be a bit overwhelmed by … life. And who better to set this young woman straight than her Aunt Fay?

letters to alice

The 16 letters from Aunt Fay (inspired by letters written by Austen to her niece) appear to have started with 18-year-old Alice having a crisis. She’s at university and finds Jane Austen “boring, petty and irrelevant.” Not only does Fay Weldon urge Alice to continue reading, separating entertainment from enlightenment, but argues for the importance of reading literature as perhaps the one thing that can save in us in this life. And thus begins a marvellous description of The City of Invention:

Those who founded it, who built it, house by house, are the novelists, the writers, the poets. And it is to this city that the readers come, to admire, to learn, to marvel and explore. 

Let us look around the city: become acquainted with it, make it our eternal, our immortal home. Looming over everything, of course, heart of the City, is the great Castle Shakespeare. You see it whichever way you look. It rears its head into the clouds, reaching into the celestial sky, dominating everything around. It’s a rather uneven building, frankly. Some complain it’s shoddy, and carelessly constructed in parts, others grumble that Shakespeare never built it anyway, and a few say the whole thing ought to be pulled down to make way for the newer and more relevant, and this prime building site released for younger talent: but the Castle keeps standing through the centuries, and build as others may they can never achieve the same grandeur. 

Fay Weldon argues that “books can be dangerous,” and there’s the example of Alice’s mother who suffered “an overdose of Georgette Heyer” which led to her marriage to Alice’s father. There’s friction between Fay, her sister and brother-in-law, and disapproval of Aunt Fay’s relationship with Alice seeps through the pages. Over the course of the letters, we see slivers of this disapproval as well as extremely witty glimpses of Alice’s life as she converts her love affair with a married professor into writing a book.

Who reads Arnold Bennett now, or Sinclair Lewis? But perhaps soon, with any luck, they’ll be rediscovered. ‘How interesting,’ people will say, pushing open the creaking doors. ‘How remarkable! Don’t you feel the atmosphere here? So familiar, so true: the amazing masquerading as the ordinary? Why haven’t we been here for so long?’ And Bennett, Lewis, or whoever, will be rediscovered, and the houses of his imagination be renovated, restored, and hinges oiled so that doors open easily, and the builder, the writer, takes his rightful place again in the great alternative hierarchy. 

Using Jane Austen as an example, the author also discusses the importance of audience, and argues that while “the life and personality of writers” are not “particularly pertinent to their work,” that writers cannot be separated from “the times” in which they live. Of course, Jane Austen is a wonderful example of that argument. Some of the letters contain some fascinating information about marriage and birth rates during Austen’s lifetime, and just the few succinct statistics really hammer home societal expectations that Austen faced.

The letters also discuss the modern writer’s life as compared to that of Austen. Whereas a modern, published writer may attend book readings and be prepared to “have your own view on everything” it wasn’t so for Austen:

Jane Austen and her contemporaries, of course, did none of this. They saved their public and their private energies for writing. They were not sent in to bat by their publishers in the interest of increased sales, nor did they feel obliged to present themselves upon public platforms as living vindication of their right to make up stories which others are expected to read.

This book of letters is typical Fay Weldon fare: lots of energy, lots of opinions (and some of those opinions are most definitely and refreshingly not PC), and bucketloads of wit. This is a delightful read for fans of Austen, fans of Weldon or those who are considering writing, which is, as Weldon argues “not a profession, it is an activity, an essential amateur occupation. It is what you do when you are not living.”

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14 Comments

Filed under Non Fiction, Weldon, Fay

14 responses to “Letters to Alice: On First Reading Jane Austen by Fay Weldon

  1. This sounds very good and perfect for me at this time. I recently re-read Jane Austen for the first time in many years, and have just finished Mansfield Park. (I also have to say I enjoy the variety of the books you read and talk about. I mostly read crime fiction so it is good to get a taste of what else is available.)

  2. Thanks Tracy. Yes Weldon makes you appreciate Austen even more. Tx for the comment. I have a few crime books waiting to be reviewed. What sort of crime books do you read, BTW? Or which authors?

  3. Well, you know, she might be onto something with Sinclair Lewis. I have read him (Babbitt and Main Street) and I think that with the souring of The American Dream readers might find that Lewis has plenty to say that’s as relevant now as before.
    I love what she says about Shakespeare. I think it’s so sad that kids today read YA that’s ‘relevant’ instead of SP. They are being short–changed, and they don’t even know it.

    • The entire section about The City of Invention is amazing. You know, America has many ‘forgotten’ authors and I don’t think that it’s a coincidence that many of them are innately political.

  4. I read this book a couple of decades or so ago now, and often mean to pick it up and read it again because, like you, I found it delightful. What’s not to like about a writer being thoughtful and perceptive about other writers after all.

  5. Thanks Guy. I’ll be reading this.

  6. A friend of mine loves this book – it’s one of her favourites. I’ve been meaning to pick up a copy for ages, so your review might just be the push I need. The combination of Weldon’s wit and insight sounds irresistible.

    As Lisa says above, there’s been a bit of a revival of interest in the work of Sinclair Lewis over the past year or so. Lots of people have been reading It Can’t Happen Here in light of the Trump phenomenon…

  7. Like you, I find both Fay Weldon and Jane Austen irresistible. You’ve drawn my attention to it before and now I will have to search for it.

  8. This sounds wonderful. I’d definitely love to read it.

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