The Spoke: Friedrich Glauser (1937)

German Literature Month 2018

German Literature month rolls around yet again. I’m late to the party–or at least my reviews are.

“There ought to be a law, the sergeant said to himself, against women painting and powdering themselves. The layer covering their cheeks could easily, all too easily, hide a flush, a sudden pallor.”

A few years ago, during German Literature Month 2015, I reviewed Friedrich Glauser’s Thumbprint. I had more Glauser on the shelf, so it was time to take the plunge…

Detective Sgt Studer of the Bern police is back once more for what should be a happy occasion. His daughter is going to be married, and the groom is Albert Guhl, a corporal in the Thurgau Cantonal Police. Studer, his wife Hedy, and daughter travel to Schwarzenstein for the ceremony and stay at a hotel run by Studer’s childhood sweetheart, Anni. Anni is now married to Karl Rechsteiner who is bedridden and has been treated for consumption.

The Spoke

Murder seems to follow fictional detectives, and this is certainly true for Studer who should be concentrating on his daughter’s wedding and instead is confronted with a corpse inside the hotel. Murder never takes a holiday, I suppose, and so Studer begins to investigate. The victim, a young man, has been skewered with a sharpened spoke from a bicycle, and guess what, there’s a bicycle repair shop right next to the hotel. …

The case seems to present its own solution, especially when the owner of the bicycle shop, Ernst Graf, seems to be one part of of a love triangle involving the murder victim.

The Spoke was more enjoyable than Thumbprint, possibly because we get to see more of Studer’s personality, investigation style, and his sense of humour, plus there are some very interesting characters/suspects here–including Fräulein Loppacher who appears to have been in relationships with both Graf (the main suspect) and Stieger (the victim). Other detectives would rush to close the case and move onto the wedding, but not Studer. Studer’s family exist in the periphery and he seems to spend far more time dwelling on Anni’s sad, hard life. The novel explores early forensics (this was published in 1937), and reflects attitudes of its time.

Studer’s sense of humour is one of the more enjoyable aspects of the tale, but unfortunately I guessed the culprit very early in the book. My copy, from Bitter Lemon Press contains a brief bio of the author, Friedrich Glauser, who was, apparently, addicted to opium and morphine. A diagnosed schizophrenic, he spent “most of his life” in various insane asylums, did a stint in the Foreign legion and prison when he was caught forging prescriptions. He died at age 42.

Translated by Mike Mitchell

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4 Comments

Filed under Fiction, Glauser Friedrich

4 responses to “The Spoke: Friedrich Glauser (1937)

  1. Ah, happy occasions rarely end well in books like this! It’s a shame that you guessed the culprit early, but at least there was some humour and good characterisation to compensate.

  2. Francois von Hurter

    So happy to see such a thoughtful review of one of our favourite Glausers! Thank you!

  3. vonhurter

    So good to see such a thoughtful review of one of our favourite Glausers. Thank you Guy!

    François

    *www.bitterlemonpress.com*

    *From:* His Futile Preoccupations ….. [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com]

    *Sent:* 23 November 2018 22:32 *To:* fvh@bitterlemonpress.com *Subject:* [New post] The Spoke: Friedrich Glauser (1937)

    Guy Savage posted: ” German Literature month rolls around yet again. I’m late to the party–or at least my reviews are. “There ought to be a law, the sergeant said to himself, against women painting and powdering themselves. The layer covering their cheeks could easily”

  4. Glauser was such a tragic character. I have a collection of his books but I’m not sure which one this is. I’ll find out. Definitely something I’d like to read.

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